The NFL is Driving Me Away

There are few things in this world that I love more than football.  I have been a fan and avid watcher of the sport for more than three decades.  Some of my fondest memories involve games watched with my father or with friends.  I have spent my hard-earned money on tickets and merchandise, and countless hours reading about my favorite team and even playing fantasy football.  I have been a loyal consumer of the product that the NFL has been selling, and it has brought me great joy.

So, why are they driving me away?

Somewhere in the back of my mind, I guess I always knew there was a dark side.  After all, this is a sport based on violence and brutality.  Sure, there is strategy involved, but that strategy still involves gigantic men destroying their bodies.  And, the ungodly amount of money involved cannot help but corrupt those who run the league.  But, somehow, I was always able to ignore all of that because I loved watching the game so much.  I have been a loyal fan, willing to turn a blind eye.

But, I cannot pretend to be blind anymore.

Today’s news about Ray Rice is the tipping point perhaps, but it is merely one of many illustrations of just how corrupt the NFL has become.  Like any big business, they are driven by profit, and as long as the money keeps rolling in, they are willing to condone just about any sort of behavior.

Let’s look at the Rice situation.  Here is a player who was seen as one of the league’s “good guys.”  He played well for a team that won the Super Bowl just a few years ago.  But, he committed the fatal error of doing something awful and getting caught.  To the league, the action does not matter nearly as much as the getting caught.  It would be foolish to believe that Rice is the first player to abuse his partner.  He just happened to do it on camera.  So, since the league could not ignore it, they did the least they could possibly do to quiet the critics.  They condemned his behavior and suspended him for 2 games.  They told us just how seriously they take the issue of domestic violence, then suspended Rice for just one-eighth of the season.  And, they were more than willing to sweep the entire incident under the rug.  But, the public, to their credit, would not let them.  After the uproar that followed what was seen as a far-too-lenient punishment, the league vowed to re-evaluate their policy on domestic violence.  They decided that a six-game suspension should apply to any future incidents.  And, again, they were willing to consider the matter settled.  But, today, after more video evidence was leaked, revealing just how brutally Rice attacked his then-fiancée, they were again pressured into action.  Ray Rice was released by his team and suspended indefinitely by the league.  There is a real possibility that he never plays football professionally again.  But, even after all that, Rice still lands on his feet.  He does not face any criminal punishment, and he has millions of dollars to cushion his fall.

And, the NFL comes out on top.  By allowing all the blame to fall on Ray Rice (and absurdly trying to blame his fiancée for being abused), the league gets to keep selling its product to a fan base that cannot get enough.  This is not to say that Rice should not be blamed.  Of course he should.  He should be blamed, he should be punished, and he should go to jail.  But, the NFL should be blamed, as well, not for the assault, but certainly for how they dealt with it.  They did as little as they could, trying to protect themselves and their product.  That is the game they play.  For the product is all that matters.

This single-minded focus on the game and the profits they reap is what allows them to stand behind a team owner in support of a racist team name.  It is what allows them to condemn the use of illegal (but harmless) drugs like marijuana while pumping their players full of dangerous prescription painkillers.  It is what allows them to ignore the countless brain injuries caused by years of players slamming themselves into each other as hard as they can.  It is what allows them to play their game in stadiums owned by billionaires and paid for by public funds taken away from education or infrastructure.  They address only what they are forced to, only those bits of the darkness that creep out into the light.

I love football, but I don’t like it anymore.  When I see a big hit, I don’t cheer.  I wonder whether the player is destroying his brain and his body.  When I see an owner in his luxury box, I think about fans who can’t afford tickets into the stadium they are paying for.  When I see a player doing charity work and photo-ops, I wonder whether he shows the same kind of compassion to his wife.  Yet, despite all this, I still watch, because I love football.

So, why is the NFL trying to drive me away?  How difficult would it be to actually do the right thing?  Why not condemn the owner of the team with the racist name rather than the woman who was beaten by a man who just so happens to be famous for playing football?  Why not embrace efforts to protect the players who make the league possible?  Why not reach out to the fans who spend the money that has made the league so profitable and address their concerns?  We don’t want much.  We just want to watch football without feeling like we’re supporting all the awful things that happen under the league’s watch.  Is that too much to ask?

Is this REALLY where we should be spending all that money?

News came out today that Bill and Melinda Gates have made a $1 million donation to support a Washington state bill that would require background checks on all gun purchases.  On its face, this is great news, as the Gateses join fellow super-rich folks like Michael Bloomberg, Paul Allen, Steve Ballmer, and Nick Hanauer in donating towards sensible gun control initiatives.  And, while I wholeheartedly support any attempts to mandate background checks and any other measures that would limit gun violence, I was also a bit saddened to realize just how much money is being spent on this nonsensical debate.

Many are celebrating the Gateses donation, including Cliff Schecter at the Daily Beast:

Gates’s fame brings more attention and further legitimizes the initiative in a way that almost nobody else could. Once the Gates Foundation made it a priority to combat malaria around the world in 2000, it brought down deaths due to the insect-borne disease by 20 percent in 11 years, saving the lives of 1 million African children in the process.

Gates has the ability to grab headlines and make an issue go viral with the constant media coverage he receives, and the financial ability, if he wins, to fund similar efforts around the country. His involvement could be the answer to the public health crisis that makes American children 93 percent of those murdered in the 26 high-income countries around the world.

But, in those paragraphs lies the most tragic part of the entire debate, namely that so much money is being spent on it that could better be spent on other things.  The Gates Foundation has already shown the good that can be done by philanthropic billionaires, and its malaria prevention effort has already saved more lives than any gun control effort ever could.  And, sure, the million dollars donated in Washington is dwarfed by the budget his Foundation spends fighting disease, but even that million dollars could do a world of good if spent elsewhere.

But, because of groups like the National Rifle Association, who spend absurd amounts of money fighting any and all efforts to keep guns out of the hands of potentially dangerous people, Gates, Bloomberg, and all the rest are now spending their money fighting against the NRA.  And, the Gateses’ million dollars, along with the $50 million donated by Bloomberg, are still dwarfed by the hundreds of millions spent by pro-gun groups.  The Washington Post details spending from 2010:

2010-expenditures-by-gunissue-nonprofits_50365ef8c7c2d_w587

 

Just imagine what all that NRA money could be used for if not for their obsession with guns.  They could fight hunger and homelessness in America, cure disease, or fund research.  But, instead they choose to spend it on making it easier to buy guns.  What a waste.

So, yes, Gates and his billionaire buddies should be applauded for entering the fight against the gun lobby.  Their efforts, and their money, could potentially save thousands of lives.  It’s just a shame that they have to.

This Man Should Not Have a Gun, and He Is Not the Only One

Georgia has gone all-in on gun rights recently, most notably with their “Guns Everywhere” law that allows guns in churches, bars, libraries, and even airports and schools.  But, even for such a pro-gun state, this is inexplicable.  A man convicted of sexual assault who attempted to rape a woman with his gun has had his right to carry a firearm restored.

Think Progress reports:

A Georgia appeals courts decision upholding the sexual assault conviction of a former cop named Dennis Krauss is difficult to read. According to the record in Krauss’ trial, the former officer was dispatched to the home of a woman who called 911 alleging that her husband had hit her. Rather than arresting the husband, however, Krauss asked the victim to ride with him in his police car. Once she was in his car, “Krauss told the victim that he could take her to jail if he wanted to” or, if she did not want to be arrested, she could have sex with him instead. Krauss’ words, according to the court opinion, were “[w]e can go to the motel or you can go to jail.”

At the motel, Krauss drew his service weapon and told the woman that he wanted to anally penetrate her with the gun. When she refused, and began to cry, “Krauss then pushed her back, pulled off her pants, and had sex with her.” And then he drove her home to the same husband that led her to call the police in the first place.

Krauss was convicted of sexual assault against a person in custody, and this one instance of sexual assault is far from the only allegation against him. According to theAtlanta Journal-Constitution, “[h]is record was filled with allegations of misconduct: that he beat a prisoner so severely the man’s brain bled; that he threatened to fabricate charges against a suspect so he could sleep with the man’s wife; that he pressured at least 10 women for sex to avoid arrest.” The former cop, for his part, is unrepentant. When asked about his sexual assault conviction, he claims that “[t]here wasn’t any crime,” and that “I was dealt a bad hand.”

And yet, in July of 2013, the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles restored Krauss’ right to carry a firearm. According to a Journal-Constitution tally, he is one of 358 violent felons who regained these rights over a six year period. That includes 32 violent felons who killed someone, and 44 who committed sex crimes. One man regained his right to own a gun in 2012 after serving a 10 year sentence for child molestation and aggravated child molestation. Some offenders regained their gun rights after being convicted of crimes such as armed robbery, burglary or aggravated assault.

Surely, even the state of Georgia can see the dangers of letting a man like this carry a weapon. This is a man convicted of a violent crime and who allegedly committed numerous others.  He used his gun to coerce a woman into non-consensual sex, and then attempted to violate her with that very weapon.  But, apparently, the right for a manany manto carry a gun outweighs the right of women not to be sexually assaulted.  Rapist, robbers, murderers, and even child molesters are allowed to carry weapons, and that is completely ludicrous.  Each of those 358 violent felons has victimized people, and can now carry a weapon that will allow them to continue their abhorrent behavior.

Courts have ruled repeatedly that violent criminals can have their right to own a gun revoked.  Yet, somehow, women and children still get little protection.  There has been resistance to keeping guns from domestic abusers or people with violence-related restraining orders.  And, in Georgia at least, even serial rapists are free to carry weapons.  Or, is sexual assault not a violent crime?  Are women not people who should be protected?  How about children?

This issue goes far beyond the Second Amendment.  For all the gray area over what the founders may have intended, no one could argue that they thought violent criminals should have weapons.  This issue is just further proof that women, children, and other victims of violent crime don’t matter to GOP lawmakers, at least not as much as guns do.

Tragedy of Errors

The death of Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, was a tragedy.  But, it is also the pivot point of a series of errors, both before and after the fatal shooting, that are tragic in their own right.

Long before Brown took that walk down the street where his body laid for hours after he was shot down, events in his town helped form a culture where an emboldened police force found itself at odds with the citizens it was tasked to protect.

These events began with the segregationist policies that resulted in a town where most of its populace is black and nearly all of its police force is white.  On its own, this may not seem problematic, but couple these demographics with the high unemployment, disproportionate targeting by law enforcement, and greater health risks among the African-American community, and the beginnings of unrest can be seen.

As Steven W Thrasher writes at the Guardian:

The symptoms of structural racism stain America everywhere, but its execution is particularly perverse in places like Ferguson. It’s not just that black drivers are stopped more often for alleged crimes than white drivers, despite the Missouri attorney general’s report that white people break the law more often. It’s not that Ferguson’s police force is 94% white in a town that’s two-thirds black. It’s not even, as Jeff Smith wrote in Monday’s New York Times, that black people – many unemployed – “do more to fund local government than relatively affluent whites” by way of those stops and the subsequent fines.

The real perversion of justice by way of modern American racism is that black people in Ferguson – like black people in the greater St Louis metropolitan area and nationally – are marginalized economically and physically from day one. That is the real looting of Ferguson.

We are consistently twice as likely to be unemployed – and in and near St Louis, “47 percent of the metro area’s African-American men between ages 16 and 24 are unemployed”. Our men are more likely to be convicted and our women are more likely to be evicted. We are more likely to be victims of predatory loans. Our children are twice as likely to have asthma (even before you teargas them). Our babies are twice as likely to die before the age of one – and their mothers are three or four times more likely to die as a result of bearing them.

The people of Ferguson could have used some help, but none was coming for them.  Yet, at the same time, their police force was being showered with fancy new toys from the federal government.  This is how the cops found themselves armed with the same kind of weapons and armor the American military used in Iraq and Afghanistan.  And, like anyone with new toys, they were eager to use them.

The community in Ferguson has suffered.  Then, one of their own was gunned down in the street, unarmed and with his hands up in submission to a police officer who then shot him dead.  And, nothing was being done.  That was simply more than the community could bear.  So, they took to the streets.

It is unfortunate that some used the protests that followed as an excuse for looting and vandalism.  And, a police response to these actions would have been justified.  But, the police were largely occupied by the peaceful protests taking place across the town.  They drove out their armored vehicles and parked them in the street.  They pointed their military-style rifles at protesters.  They threw tear gas.  They arrested protesters and journalists.  And, they fired their weapons at the citizens of the town they served.  And, though the rounds they fired were “non-lethal,” they were certainly still capable of injuring and intimidating the people who wanted nothing more than to show their grief and frustration to the world.

This parade of tragic errors, from arming the police like the army, to the economic and legal oppression of a community, to the murder of a young black man, to looting, to violent suppression of peaceful protest, has brought the city of Ferguson to where it is today.  The question is, what now?

Errors just like these have taken place all across the country, and each of them can be learned from.  We should be motivated to examine policies that have led to segregated towns and the oppression of minorities.  We should examine how we have armed our police and empowered them to use tools of war against their own communities.  We should examine how we respond to peaceful protest.  We can listen to the people of Ferguson and we can change our ways.  Mistakes have been made and tragedies have resulted, but these mistakes do not have to be repeated.  We can learn from them and we can be better.

This is Why People Don’t Like Cops

I have been fortunate enough to have had very few encounters with the police in my life.  I don’t think that I am any more well-behaved than most people, but I do have the societal advantages of white skin and growing up in the suburbs.  Many other people do not, and therefore their interactions with the police are far more numerous, and far more potentially dangerous.  And, based on what they have seen and experienced they have grown distrustful of cops.  After reading things like this, and after what I keep seeing on the news, I can’t say that I blame them.

Sunil Dutta, a LAPD officer, believes that there is an easy solution to police violence: just do whatever they tell you to do.  He says:

Even though it might sound harsh and impolitic, here is the bottom line: if you don’t want to get shot, tased, pepper-sprayed, struck with a baton or thrown to the ground, just do what I tell you. Don’t argue with me, don’t call me names, don’t tell me that I can’t stop you, don’t say I’m a racist pig, don’t threaten that you’ll sue me and take away my badge. Don’t scream at me that you pay my salary, and don’t even think of aggressively walking towards me. Most field stops are complete in minutes. How difficult is it to cooperate for that long?

At least he concedes that most people don’t want to get tased, pepper-sprayed, struck with a baton or thrown to the ground.  But, you know what else people don’t want?  They don’t want to get harassed by entitled police officers who abuse their power and disproportionately target minorities.

While it might be easy for Officer Dutta to suggest that the people he stop just do what he tells them, it is far more difficult for people to follow that suggestion when they are stopped repeatedly and for no reason.  If Dutta was stopped while walking down the street just because of the color of his skin, would he be so quick to comply?  How about the second time it happened, or the third?  How about if it happened all the time?  At what point is it okay to resist an unjust system?  At what point is it okay NOT to cooperate?  Even if a stop is “complete in minutes,” would he agree to be stripped of his dignity for that long?  Would he stand by and watch others suffer the same humiliation?

Dutta continues:

You don’t know what is in my mind when I stop you. Did I just get a radio call of a shooting moments ago? Am I looking for a murderer or an armed fugitive? For you, this might be a “simple” traffic stop, for me each traffic stop is a potentially dangerous encounter. Show some empathy for an officer’s safety concerns. Don’t make our job more difficult than it already is.

The officer would be wise to listen to his own advice.  He could stand to show some empathy himself.  He does not know what is in the mind of the person being stopped any more than they know what is in his.  Is this person a victim of a police force that abuses its power and targets certain segments of the community?  Is he marked as a suspect in that shooting or murder Dutta just got a call about simply because of his clothing or skin color?  Does he live in a world where no traffic stop is ever really “simple?”  Is he part of a community where the potential danger far too often is for the one who is stopped?  While Dutta’s job may truly be difficult, he is speaking to people whose entire lives are difficult, largely because of a society that wants them to just comply while it continues to abuse and humiliate them.

Dutta goes on:

Community members deserve courtesy, respect and professionalism from their officers. Every person stopped by a cop should feel safe instead of feeling that their wellbeing is in jeopardy. Shouldn’t the community members extend the same courtesy to their officers and project that the officer’s safety is not threatened by their actions?

What if the community members don’t receive the courtesy, respect and professionalism they deserve?  What if they don’t feel safe?  What if their well-being is in jeopardy?  Mike Brown’s certainly was.  And, I don’t think the bullets that killed him came with any courtesy or respect.

Communities have entrusted their police forces with certain powers.  But, regardless of what Officer Dutta seems to think, their responsibility is to the community.  They are public servants, trusted to protect the communities they work for.  And, yes, that sometimes means using force when necessary.  But, that does not mean they have license to use force whenever they want.  And, as citizens see their police forces behave like an occupying army, they get the urge to resist.  And, when the police are not held accountable for their misdeeds, that urge grows.  And, when they see one of their own shot down by the very people tasked with protecting them, they cry out.

Dutta addresses this use of force:

[C]ops are legally prohibited from using excessive force: The moment a suspect submits and stops resisting, the officers must cease use of force.

This is great, in theory, but reality shows that this is simply not true.  Mike Brown submitted.  He did not resist.  By all accounts, he had his hands raised in surrender.  He was shot and killed and left to lie in the street.  And, he is not alone.

Dutta says, “cops are not murderers.”  But, sometimes they are.  And, when nothing is done, it makes it that much easier for the next cop to shoot and kill the next unarmed black man walking down the street, and that much harder for people to just do what they are told.

Iraq and Gaza – Humanitarianism and Hypocrisy

Yet again, the American military is intervening in Iraq.  However, this time the intervention is being sold to the public as a humanitarian mission.  ISIS (The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria [also known as ISIL, or the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant]), an offshoot of al-Qaeda, has expanded its military operations.  Having already taken over large parts of Syria and Iraq, they have now encroached into Kurdistan, an area in northern Iraq occupied by ethic Kurds that is largely autonomous.

The reasons for this invasion are not entirely clear, but theories range from a land grab by ISIS, to a possible desire to take over Kurdish oil fields, to a complete wiping out of the Kurdish people and other non-Muslim minorities, including Iraqi Christians and Yazidis.  Slate’s Reihan Salam expands on this last theory:

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria steals with the best of them, and I don’t doubt that some of the fighters who’ve attached themselves to its cause are thrill-seeking psychopaths like those you’ll find in any lawless hellhole. On the whole, however, you get the impression that its fighters aren’t killing for fun and profit, and they’re certainly not killing to protect themselves from other crazies. Instead, they are killing because they are utopians. They want to live in a world that is quite literally cleansed of those who do not share their deranged beliefs, and by killing Yazidis and Christians and members of other religious minorities, they believe that they are serving a noble and just cause. The Taliban are awful, but given their willingness to cut deals with the Afghan government and the United States and its allies, they aren’t quite so insane. Even al-Qaida is more tolerant of religious minorities than the lunatics of ISIS. Now, with hundreds of millions of dollars worth of stolen loot, ISIS is on the march, closing in on stranded pockets of women and men they see as pagans and slowly starving them to death. The Kurdish peshmerga, the only Iraqi fighting force capable of holding ISIS at bay, has put up a brave resistance, yet they are starting to buckle.

And, it is this targeting of religious minorities and the buckling of Kurdish forces that has drawn the United States back into the fray.  As many as 40,000 Yazidis fled from an ISIS invasion of the town of Sinjar up a nearby mountain.  They were surrounded by ISIS troops and cut off from access to food and water.

In response, President Obama announced a humanitarian mission that would drop food and water to the refugees trapped on Mount Sinjar.  Good.  Any attempt to save people from being slaughtered should be applauded.  However, this mission was accompanied by bombing and airstrikes from American planes.  While the stated goal was to protect Americans in Iraq and keep ISIS from following the Yazidis up the mountain, I have long believed and argued that peace cannot be achieved through violence.  But, the threat that the Yazidis and Kurds face is very real, and they deserve our help, though I do wish we would drop more food and fewer bombs.

President Obama has spoken out on his decision to act in Iraq:

And when many thousands of innocent civilians are faced with the danger of being wiped out and we have the capacity to do something about it, we will take action. That is our responsibility as Americans. That’s a hallmark of American leadership. That’s who we are.

Is that really who we are?  I wish it were true.  But, the situation in Iraq brings to mind another group of people who are being slaughtered and cut off from food and water by an invading army.  Thousands have already died, and even though there have been occasional breaks in the fighting, there are no humanitarian food drops to keep these people from starving.  This raises the obvious question: what about Gaza?

The plight of Palestinians in Gaza has been largely forgotten in the wake of the atrocities in Iraq, but the casualties there continue to pile up, and they continue to starve.  Are Palestinians not worth saving?  Do the crimes of their Hamas leadership mean they all must suffer?  Israel may not be quite as guilty on the war crimes scale as ISIS, but they are far from innocent.  It is they who have blockaded Gaza over land and sea, encroached on its land, and killed its citizens.  Won’t America intervene?

But, we have intervened, on the side of Israel.  It is our money that buys their rockets.  And, it is our implicit endorsement of their policies that keeps the United Nations from taking action.  American hypocrisy in choosing whom to protect and whom to ignore has resulted in well over a thousand deaths, most of them civilians.  We have the capacity to do something about it.  Isn’t that our responsibility?  We don’t even have to drop any bombs.  We could just stop selling our bombs to Israel for them to drop.

So, what is it that makes Yazidis worth defending and not Palestinians?  Is it just coincidence that in both incidences we have sided against Muslims?  Perhaps, though in both cases we have been careful to classify them as extremists.  Is it just coincidence that we have economic interests both in Israel and in the oil fields of Kurdistan?  Again, perhaps, though there is little doubt that these economic interests color our judgment.  But, if economics are driving decision-making, it would be important to remember that food is cheaper than bombs.  It would be even more important to remember that all oppressed and hungry people are worth saving, no matter where they live.

If There is a “War on Whites” (and there is not), Whites are Winning

My knee-jerk response when I hear people like Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) claim that there is a “War on Whites” is to tell him to shut the fuck up.  But, on second thought, it might be best if he keeps running his mouth, as his comments illustrate a common belief among many in the privileged class, which is that their privileges are in danger.  And, that thought terrifies them.

This same belief can be seen in males who claim a “war on men,” or evangelicals railing against a “war on religion,” or homophobes scared of a “war on traditional marriage” or even one-percenters spouting about a “war on wealth.”  It’s all nonsense, and it all comes from the same place.  These are all classes of people who have gotten comfortable with their position and don’t want to see anything change the status quo.  It’s good to be a rich, straight, Christian, white male, and they will fight to make sure it stays that way.

Now, the disclaimer: I am a straight, white male.  And, while I am neither Christian or rich, I come from a churchgoing upper-middle class family, which is almost as good (at least in the minds of those claiming the world is suddenly turning against them).  I have seen and experienced the privilege that comes with being all of those things.  I have found employment fairly easily, and have not had to worry whether I’m being paid as much as others doing the same work.  I can walk down the street without being harassed for my gender or race.  I married my wife without fear of protest or condemnation to hell.  I have not been called a terrorist when I grow facial hair or because of who I choose to pray to (or if I choose to pray at all).  When people like Brooks think about “real Americans,” it is people who look a lot like me that they are talking about.  But, where Brooks sees entitlement, as if he has done something to earn the privilege he has received, I see injustice and hypocrisy.

Of course, Brooks does not admit to thinking that whites deserve the benefits they have received (or even that they have received any benefits at all).  On the contrary, Brooks says:

I’m one of those who does not believe in racism and I believe everyone should be treated equally as American citizens.

While I’m sure Brooks thought this was a very noble statement, it is actually both ignorant and dishonest.  Racism is real, whether Brooks believes in it or not, just like evolution or climate change.  What Brooks really means when he says that is, “I’m not a racist,” just like his comments that everyone should be treated equally.  But, that part is bullshit, too.  Brooks does not want everyone to be treated equally.  What he wants is for people to be treated the way he is used to them being treated.  That means privilege for whites and scraps for the rest.  He may say he wants a level playing field, but what he really wants is the current tilted field where whites are at the top and everyone else is at the bottom, looking up at them, and struggling to climb the hill.

Brooks continues his attempts to pretend that all Americans are the same:

“It doesn’t make any difference if you’re a white American, a black American, a Hispanic American, an Asian American or if you’re a woman or a man. Every single demographic group is hurt by falling wages and lost jobs,” he said.

But, Brooks forgets one very important point:  whites (and specifically white men) are hurt much less than anyone else.  But, to Brooks, if he gets a splinter in his finger, it is no different from a woman or minority getting her legs blown off.  All injury is the same in Brooks’ view.  And, Brooks is especially sneaky by making this claim as part of an argument against immigration, a position that is inherently based on maintaining white dominance, or as some call it, avoiding “ethnic replacement.”  But, as usual, someone else has made this point better than I can, in this case, Mychal Denzel Smith at the Nation:

It’s true, we’re all hurt by falling wages and lost jobs (except black Americans can’t even catch a break when there’s an increase in jobs). It’s also true, however, that that has nothing to do with immigration. But it’s Brooks’s assertion that a “racial issue” is an “emotional” rather than “thoughtful issue” I most take umbrage with.

It’s the type of language used to dismiss the real-world concerns of those of us who live on the oppressed side of racism in America. Our issues aren’t considered serious intellectual questions but emotional reactions that are to be dealt with personally. But any discussion of jobs and wages that doesn’t consider race (or gender) is intellectually dishonest. To pretend there are not groups of people who are disproportionately disadvantaged under our current economic model and that our ongoing legacy of racism and white supremacy are not contributing factors means you are not actually looking for solutions. You’re turning the same blind eye that has allowed the suffering in the first place.

There is no “War on Whites,” just like there is no war on religion, men, rich people, or straight people.  However, there is a fight for equality—real equality—and that is a fight that Brooks is scared to lose.  But, at least for now, he has nothing to fear.  If there really was a “War on Whites,” (and again, there most certainly is not), whites would be winning handily.  Don’t believe me?  Just look at the makeup of our government, or the Fortune 500, or our jails, or our neighborhoods.  White people are doing just fine.  What Brooks is doing is pandering to the fears of people who are scared to lose their place at the top of the heap, a place they have done nothing to earn.  But, paranoia is strong, and it can be a powerful motivator at election time, more powerful than reality.  It’s still bullshit.